News

Off the Internet for Awhile

Jeff VanderMeer • April 23rd, 2013 • News

From April 24 through December 1, I will have limited internet access and only be checking my email sporadically, so I can work on my novels. If you have a query related to book rights, please contact my agent Sally Harding at the Cooke Agency. If you have a question regarding event bookings or an urgent matter that cannot wait, please email my wife, Ann VanderMeer, or use the contact form here on my blog.

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Wonderbook: An Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction (out in October)

Jeff VanderMeer • April 23rd, 2013 • Culture, News

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(early draft of the cover)

One reason I’ve been so quiet here on my blog is that I’ve been working nonstop on Wonderbook: An Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction. This is the world’s first fully illustrated, full-color guide to creative writing, with many of the images replacing instructional text. Jeremy Zerfoss did most of the art; his instructional diagrams are based on my rough sketches. The remaining art comes from over 30 artists from all over the world. More than 80 writers contributed to the book through sidebar essays, spotlight features, or just quotes in the main text. (I’ll have a full TOC posted closer to the publication date.) There are over 250 images in Wonderbook.

I cannot thank Abrams Image, my publisher, and David Cashion, my editor, enough. They gave me the budget, time, and support to go off and create the entire 352-page book from scratch–overseeing all aspects of the art and design–and to deliver it to them complete. I cannot think of another time that this has occurred, and it may never again. I feel incredibly lucky.

But as we finish up on the book–we’ve turned in the layouts to the publisher, and are just working on a last few images–I thought I’d share some teasers here from the book so you can begin to get an idea of it. I’m not going to post much from the innovative instructional diagrams, but you can probably still get some sense of the scope. Basically, this book is meant to be of use to any beginning or intermediate writer, but its foundation is in the fantastical. Most general writing books use realism as their foundational stance…

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It Came From the North: A Call for Finnish Speculative Fiction Submissions

Jeff VanderMeer • April 23rd, 2013 • News

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Announcing…IT CAME FROM THE NORTH, Volume 1, edited by Desirina Boskovich, to be published as an e-book by Cheeky Frawg. This will be a sampler of Finnish speculative fiction. Here is the relevant information…

Submissions can be sent to: [email protected] The deadline is May 30 of this year. Open to both reprints and originals, 10,000 words or less. Must be available in English translation. Boskovich says, “Anything with a speculative or fantastic or weird bent is welcome (though those boundaries will not be rigidly applied). People should also feel welcome to send suggestions to that address, as well as any questions they have.” Normal reprint rates apply. If the e-book is successful, there will be additional volumes featuring Scandinavian countries—and the volumes may be collected in a print omnibus.

We realize that this is a tight deadline, but the e-book will be published alongside our publication in October of books by two Finnish writers: Leena Krohn’s Datura and Jyrki Vainonen’s The Explorer & Other Stories.

More Deals for The Southern Reach Trilogy

Jeff VanderMeer • April 5th, 2013 • News

The Southern Reach trilogy (Annihilation, Authority, and Acceptance) has sold in three separate rather stunning pre-empt deals: Canadian rights to HarperCollins Canada, Brazilian rights to Intrinseca, and UK rights to The Fourth Estate (which also publishes Michael Chabon, Hilary Mantel, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie). I’m thrilled because they’re all three great publishers. As the London Book Fair approaches, I should have more news about other deals. This on the heels of the FSG book deal and Paramount movie rights deal. Many thanks to FSG and to my agent Sally Harding for their continuing awesome belief in this series.

I do plan to blog more here, but I have a few deadlines to take care of first.

Blunderbook: Wonderbook and Booklife Follow-up

Jeff VanderMeer • April 1st, 2013 • News

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Out in 2015, this will be the follow-up to my Wonderbook: An Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction and Booklife: Strategies & Survival Tips for the 21st-Century Writer.

Art by Jeremy Zerfoss.

The Southern Reach Series: Out from FSG in 2014, Optioned for Film

Jeff VanderMeer • March 30th, 2013 • News

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(A photo I took while hiking out at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, here in North Florida.)

As part of my attempts to be more consistent about blogging, I thought I’d share some relevant info and links about my Southern Reach series, which is coming out from FSG in 2014 and was just optioned by Paramount Pictures and Scott Rudin Productions. The novels are, in order, entitled Annihilation, Authority, and Acceptance. The subtext and thematic concerns of each play off of those titles in what I hope are somewhat sneaky ways. All three are also words used as hypnosis cues by one character to maintain control over other characters.

I posted a short synopsis of Annihilation, the first book, awhile back on this blog—as well as a short, rough-draft excerpt of the opening back when I finished it. A little later, I posted a bit from a section on the main character.

The mysterious Area X, a seemingly pristine wilderness protected by an invisible border, in which odd things are occurring, is heavily based on the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. I’ve hiked there for over 15 years now, and the 14-mile trail I do is basically (transformed) the setting for Annihilation. Although none of the strange things in the book have occurred to me while hiking, some form of them has. For example, being charged by a wild boar or the peculiar dislocation of encountering dolphins in freshwater canals beside the trail. Other sections of the novel are based on exploring Botanical Bay on Vancouver Island. And there are other real-world affinities that make Annihilation very personal to me. (You can find nonfiction about me hiking in St. Marks in this blog entry.)

Meanwhile, the second book, Authority, is set back across the border, in the world we all know. The main character goes by the nickname of “Control” and has just taken over as the new director of the Southern Reach, the secret government agency that oversees the often ill-fated expeditions into Area X, trying to find out what’s going on. Control is another character, like the biologist, who goes his own way, but has been protected by his pedigree as a third-generation spook. What he finds in the Southern Reach is an agency that, over 30 years, has become more and more eccentric and less logical in its approaches. Not only does he have to negotiate his way through a toxic, Kafkaesque work terrain, but new information from Area X makes his job, and the tasks before him, ever more perilous and important. This situation combines with the odd notes left by the former director and newly uncovered video footage from the first expedition to go into Area X to give the novel the outward texture of a thriller. Learning more about the invisible border and other elements also makes Authority rather tension-filled.

That’s pretty much all I’m willing to share about book two for now, except to say that it starts with a few shocks and just ramps up from there, but all of it firmly grounded in Control and his viewpoint on things.

Here are some other links of possible interest.

—Happy to see someone getting the texture/tone of the Southern Reach series right.

—Speculation here about how quickly the movie rights to the books were picked up. In actual fact, they read the first novel and loved it.

—Short piece that talks about the books not being YA. This is true. But the generalizations about YA speak more to the fact it’s a catch-all category than the actual quality of individual YA books.

–Indiewire places the Southern Reach series in the dystopia category. I think that’s legit from the brief descriptions of the novel out there, but I don’t view it as a dystopic vision, really.

I’m also happy to say I’m finished editing Annihilation for FSG, except for some mop-up, and I absolutely love my editor there, Sean MacDonald. Great notes and just the entire time I’ve felt we were on the same page. I think the novel is much better because of his involvement, and I feel very relaxed about the process of completing novels two and three.

A couple of people have asked me if I feel more pressure about completing the second and third novel after the movie deal news. The fact is, I don’t at all. If anything, I feel energized. It’s great enough that it’s Paramount, but Rudin’s production company has produced some of my all-time favorite films and they have a knack for turning novels into great movies, so it just motivates me even more. Nor does the idea of there potentially being movie versions out at all influence my writing process. I’m focused on doing what’s best for the novels, period.

So, in all possible ways, I think this is just a great situation to be in, and the only thing I’m grateful for is that it’s happening to me in my forties not when I was in my twenties or something. That twenty-something Jeff probably wouldn’t have been able to take it in stride, to be honest. Forty-something Jeff has pretty much experienced every possible scenario in publishing and it takes a lot to knock him out of his rhythm.

Oxford Exchange in Tampa: Book Haul

Jeff VanderMeer • March 28th, 2013 • Book Reviews, News

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We meant to work all day while still here in Tampa, but took some time off this afternoon to go to the Cigar City Brewery and then Del Rio’s for dinner (a great Cuban place). But before that, we stopped by the Oxford Exchange Bookstore, which was recommended to us by Liz at USF (thanks!). What a great, well-curated, unique bookstore! Definitely worth it. I haven’t bought books in awhile, and I’m sorry to say I splurged. (Well, not too sorry.)

In this first photo, just a few notes. I’ve wanted the Lethem collection for awhile—can’t wait to dig into that. Snow I have in another edition, but the font was just not right for me, so this Everyman edition is a godsend. Weirdlife is about the search for unusual lifeforms. It’s a good refresher as I dive into the second Southern Reach novel, Authority, on a couple of areas of interest.

Peter Nadas’ sprawling novel set during the middle of the last century just was too enticing to pass up—just an amazing-looking book that I’m going to be immersed in, I’m sure. Ann wanted Miss Dreamville and the new Karen Russell collection, so I added on Swamplandia, to give it another go. The Nabokov biography I had to buy since I collect all things Nabokov, including nonfiction about him. This is probably around the 80th book in my collection. Its slant is that there is a lot of politics and whatnot in the backdrop and subtext of the master’s work. To which I say, well, DUH. Too bad a world-class style and verve can blind us to what’s staring out right in front of us.

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Ann also wanted the New American Haggadah, which looks fascinating for a number of reasons. Viola Di Grado’s novel from one of my favorite imprints, Europa, just grabbed me from the first paragraph and I couldn’t pass it up. Similarly, Speedboat by Renata Adler, a reprint from the 1970s, captured me and wouldn’t let me go. It’s from another of my favorite presses, New York Review of Books, which does such a wonderful job of bringing fiction into the world that might not otherwise be in print. Buying How Fiction Works was another case of having an edition where I hated the font. This more portable, better-designed edition I’m already having more luck with. I don’t agree with Wood on everything, but it’s useful to engage with his ideas.

I was so happy to find The Best of Archy and Mehitabel—a lovely set of poems/adventures featuring a cat and a cockroach. Without Michael Moorcock mentioning Archy to me a decade ago I never would’ve discovered these too joyful miscreants. Ann wanted the Book of Nice, which I pointed out was from the same publisher has her perennial favorite Bad Cats. And the Oxford Exchange also has lovely notebooks, of which I purchased two.

The ambiance of the Oxford Exchange bookstore is rather amazing—the curating of the bookstore is eccentric in a meaningful rather than frivolous way. It is on the small side, but it makes the space count, and the selections seemed to hit my sweet spot rather more often than not. The many props, including manual typewriters and card catalogues, lend a real weight to the place as well. Beyond the bookstore is a more general gift store, a coffee shop, and a restaurant. All of it combined lends itself to a great experience—and across the street is the University of Tampa, with its steely minarets and nice river walk. I highly recommend you check out the bookstore if you are in the area.

2013 Crawford Award Winner and Shortlist Announced

Jeff VanderMeer • February 4th, 2013 • News

Just received this press release that Karin Tidbeck’s Jagannath from our Cheeky Frawg Books has won the 2013 Crawford Memorial Award!

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The winner of the 2013 Crawford Memorial Award, presented annually by the International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts for an outstanding first fantasy book, is Karin Tidbeck for Jagannath: Stories (Cheeky Frawg Books).

According to award administrator Gary K. Wolfe, the decision on the final award was an unusually difficult one for the nominating committee, whose members also want to call particular attention to the close runner-up, Rachel Hartman, for her novel Seraphina (Random House). Other books on this year’s shortlist are Saladin Ahmed’s Throne of the Crescent Moon (DAW), Roz Kaveney’s Rituals: Rhapsody of Blood, Volume One (Plus One), and Kiini Ibura Salaam’s Ancient, Ancient: Short Fiction (Aqueduct).

Participating in this year’s nomination and selection process were Cheryl Morgan, Ellen Klages, Niall Harrison, Graham Sleight, Liza Groen Trombi, Stacie Hanes, Karen Burnham, and Jonathan Strahan. The award will be presented on March 23 during the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts in Orlando, Florida.

Ann VanderMeer: Awards Eligibility

Jeff VanderMeer • January 29th, 2013 • News

It’s that time of year where people make other people aware of what they’ve done so nothing slips through the cracks re voted-on awards. So…

Ann VanderMeer did much of the work of selecting fiction at Weirdfictionreview.com and also published her last issue of Weird Tales (full contents listed here–all material chosen by her), Ann edited Steampunk III: Steampunk Revolution in 2012. This makes her eligible to be nominated for the best editor, short form, category for the Hugo Award. Her work in general, the anthology and Weirdfictionreview.com are eligible for various other awards that have the requisite categories.

Here’s more information on Steampunk Revolution, which was released in December and got a little bit lost in the shuffle…

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What if Steampunk had a revolution? What if this genre that is so closely tied to the past burst forth into the future – breaking down definitional barriers and forging ahead? Steampunk Revolution features a renegade collective of writers —including steampunk legends as well as hot, new talents—who are rebooting the steam-driven past and powering it into the future with originality, wit, and adventure. Going far beyond corsets and goggles, Steampunk Revolution is not just a ride in your great-great granddad’s zeppelin—now it’s a much wilder ride.

The entire list of contributors: Christopher Barzak, Paolo Chikiamco, Amal El-Mohtar, Jeffrey Ford, Lev Grossman, Samantha Henderson, Leow Hui Min Annabeth, N.K. Jemison, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Malissa Kent, Andrew Knighton, Nick Mamatas, David Erik Nelson, Morgan Johnson, and Fritz Swanson, Garth Nix, Ben Peek, Cherie Priest, Margaret Ronald, Christopher Rowe, Vandana Singh, Bruce Sterling, Karin Tidbeck, Lavie Tidhar, Catherynne M. Valente, Genevieve Valentine, Jeff VanderMeer, Carrie Vaughn, J.Y. Yang, Jaymee Goh, Margaret Killjoy, Austin Sirkin and book design/art by John Coulthart.

Not including the original nonfiction, the original stories are as follows:

Malissa Kent – The Heart is the Matter
Caitlin Kiernan -Goggles (c. 1910)
Vandana Singh – A Handful of Rice (novella)

Note: If voting for Weirdfictionreview.com for anything, you should list “Ann & Jeff VanderMeer and Adam Mills”. Adam is our managing editor.

The Situation Web Comic by VanderMeer and Orchard–Hugo Award Eligible

Jeff VanderMeer • January 28th, 2013 • News

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I know it’s pretty much the norm now to let people know what your Hugo Award-eligible works were right around this time. It still feels a little weird to me to clog up my blog with this stuff, but on the other hand this time I’ve got something fairly unique.

The Situation is a webcomic based on a short story of mine. I wrote the comics script for it and Eric Orchard did the art. It’s up on Tor.com and it did in fact come out in 2012, so it is eligible for the Hugo Award–in the category of Best Graphic story. So you’d be voting for:

The Situation (Tor.com; Jeff VanderMeer and Eric Orchard)

So, go check it out and if you like it, consider voting for it. I’m really proud of it, and I think Orchard did a great job with the art.