Ann VanderMeer’s Worldcon Schedule

Ann’s in San Antonio, at this year’s Worldcon. Here’s her schedule starting tomorrow.

She also has an advance copy of Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction with her, for those who might be interested in a sneak peek. (Check at Carrie Ann Baade’s booth at DragonCon this weekend as well–she has a Wonderbook display copy).

Here’s Ann’s particulars:

Friday, August 30
– 12:00-12:30 Signing at Tachyon Table in Dealer’s room
– 3:00-4:00 Creating Anthologies – How do you create a good anthology? With Ellen Datlow (M), Ann VanderMeer, John Joseph Adams, David G. Hartwell, James Gunn
– 4:00-5:00 Canon Formation: How Do We Decide What Becomes a “Classic”? – Canon formation takes place through awards short lists, juries, critical essays, and anthologies. What conscious processes inform these decisions, and how do canons form over time? With Karen Burnham (M), Ann VanderMeer, Jacob Weisman, Damien Broderick

Saturday, August 31
– 4:00-5:00 Alice Sheldon and Susan Wood: Can They Still Inspire Us? – Feminism caught fire in the SF community in the 1970s. The Tiptree Award, Broad Universe, Japan’s Sense of Gender Award. Do you feel the heat? With Liz Gorinsky (M), Mari Kotani, Ann VanderMeer, Pat Murphy, Catherynne M. Valente

Sunday, Sept 1
– 1:00 – 2:00 Intersection of Science, Space Exploration, and Speculative Fiction – with Astronaut Cady Coleman, Ann VanderMeer, John Chu, Marco Palmieri
– 3:00-4:00 Into Darkness: Horror and Dark Fantasy – Who’s doing great work with horror and dark fantasy right now? Where are the best places to find and read these works? With Lee Harris (M), John Joseph Adams, Greg Ketter, Julia Rios, Ann VanderMeer

The Southern Reach Trilogy: FSG Cover Reveal for Annihilation (with animation!)

annihilation animation

Farrar, Straus and Giroux has revealed the cover for the first novel in my Southern Reach trilogy: Annihilation. Along with a description of the novel AND an animated version of the cover…Go check it out! And post a comment if you like it.

Helsinki’s 2015 Worldcon Bid and a Cornucopia of Finnish Speculative Fiction (free e-book)

helsinkiworldcon_banner_2013 copy

We here at Cheeky Frawg had no idea that Helsinki would be vying to host the 2015 Worldcon when we started to acquire books by Finnish writers for our line, supported by generous grants from FILI, the Finnish Literature Exchange. We just knew that there as a rather amazing amount of talent in Finland when it came to speculative fiction, weird fiction, fantasy, SF—whatever you want to call it. And that this talent was backed up by a very strong and knowledgeable SF/F community.

But we now find the release of our books (in October) coinciding in part with Helsinki’s bid, and we’d just like to say how strongly we support that bid—in part because their home grown talent is so great. You’ll note the names on the image above, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. And one reason we think a Helsinki Worldcon makes so much sense is the number of really interesting writers you’ll discover—as interesting in person as on the page.

In fact, in celebration of that bid, we’d like to offer, for free, an ebook of Finnish writer Leena Krohn’s World Fantasy Award finalist Tainaron, one of our favorite short novels of all time. Just through today, midnight Eastern Standard Time. Just email me at [email protected] with the subject line Free E-book and specify mobi (Kindle) or epub and I’ll send it to you. I’ll send them out in batches, so don’t worry if you don’t hear right away. All requests will be filled by tomorrow afternoon, tops.

Not only are we releasing Krohn’s Datura in October, but next year we are putting out a 900-page omnibus of Krohn’s collected novels in English, along with some short fiction and commissioned essays.

The Care and Feeding of the Structures We Build

Assuming for the sake of argument (because it doesn’t need to be this way in reality) that we must delineate fiction as realistic or non-realistic (read, “fantastical” if you like or surreal or magically real or magically delicious if you really must)… then thinking for a moment from the point of view of someone passionate about nonrealistic fiction…Imagine for a moment any and all organizations or institutions or awards systems that exist in the service of such literature…Wouldn’t you want these organizations and institutions and awards systems to have true interest in true diversity of this kind of fiction?—for example, the same passion for it wherever it might be found around the world and with an appreciation for and delight in how it differs and where it is the same—and to be willing to learn different ways of reading and to become attuned to and aware of different traditions of literature?

For example, too, no less passion for the magically real or the magically delicious if found in mainstream lit journals rather than in genre publications (able to recognize it even in the “wrong” context, not rendered invisible merely by the company kept)…or that in aggregate understand and approve of and actively support the elation of, for example, a reader in one language finding the amazing fantastical stories of some neglected writer in another language, glimpsed in the form of just a couple of tales or even a fragment of translation—this reader whose elation is not really even about the treasure itself but how it suggests the outline of something greater that is still excruciatingly only half-seen, texts time-traveling from the past to the present that help to form a more complete picture and a more complete conversation…

Wouldn’t you want institutions and organizations and award systems that while they recognize and appreciate the center of things also have a sense of stewardship for those most experimental examples of the form that need help to find an audience and that through their adventurousness allow other brave, but not as brave, souls to travel farther than they might? Institutions and organizations and award systems that have the wisdom to bypass tired binary arguments about high and low art, genre and mainstream, that largely ignore territorialism and ideology while correcting for the kind of territorialism and ideology that negate a level playing field and make us all, in a way, more selfish. In short, wouldn’t you want organizations and institutions and award systems that possess in the very syntax of their bylaws the same roving curiosity and passion that make of us as individuals vast and generous and joyful and omnivorous readers?