Open Call for Submissions – Feminist Speculative Fiction Anthology

Ann & Jeff VanderMeer are pleased to announce a call for submissions for a new anthology on Feminist Speculative Literature.  This project will be published by PM Press under the guidance and co-publishing arrangement with Jef Smith of GeekRadical and is scheduled to be released in May 2013.  The anthology will emphasize women’s speculative fiction from the 1970s onward, looking to explore women’s rights as well as gender/race/class/etc. from as many perspectives as possible.  Although we already have stories and writers in mind we also know that we can’t see everything so are asking for submissions as well as suggestions. If in doubt, send it.

We will read submissions between June 15, 2012 and August 5, 2012. Any English-language story (or translation into English) previously published since 1970 on a website or in a print publication is eligible for consideration. Looking for reprints only (standard reprint rates apply).  Prefer works under 10,000 words.  Willing to look at all kinds of Feminist Speculative fiction, but mainly interested in work that pushes the boundaries, that is truly unique to the genre.

Submissions up to 10,000 words should be sent in a Word or RTF document attachment to femspecfic at hotmail.com. Please cut-and-paste the first three paragraphs into the body of your email and include prior publication information, but no need to include any biographical information about yourself. If you prefer, use snail mail by sending your work to POB 38190, Tallahassee, FL 32315, USA. Snail mail submissions should be marked on the outside of the envelope as for Feminist Spec Fic consideration. No SASE is required if you prefer email response. All submissions will be responded to no later than August 15, 2012; please do not query about a submission prior to that date. Those sending in their suggestions—thanks so much, and thanks for understanding that we will not have time to reply.

Payment will be on publication, at standard reprint rates of one to two cents per word, against a share of any royalties from the North American or foreign editions, as well as one contributor copy.

(Ann here: if you post questions as comments, I will do my best to answer in the comments as soon as possible – thx!)

UPDATE – Please limit the number of unique submissions per writer to 3 stories.  If you plan to send more than one, make sure we see the top, best 3 stories that fit this theme, thanks!

Comments

  1. Kai in NYC says

    Kate Wilhelm’s, “No Light in the Window.” It may be in the Norton Book of Science Fiction, but it definitely is in the collection edited by Justine Larbalestier, Daughters of Earth.

  2. says

    I have a list of several feminist specfic works at http://www.cynthiaward.com/feminist.html – not complete, and containing mostly novels, but there are also stories, collections, and anthologies on the list.

    A great story not on this list is Lucy Sussex’s “My Lady Tongue” (http://www.amazon.com/My-lady-tongue-other-tales/dp/0855613637).

    If you want mention of excellent feminist specfic novels, there is also Zoe Fairbairns’ Benefits (http://www.amazon.com/Benefits-Zoe-Fairbairns/dp/B001RDCHZA/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1339706993&sr=1-1&keywords=zoe+fairbairns+benefits)

  3. Ann VanderMeer says

    You can certainly send more than one, but I’d limit it to your top 3 stories that fit this project. That keeps it fair for everyone else. Thx!

  4. Rachel says

    Hi there, if sending multiple submissions (up to 3) would you prefer them all in one email or in 3 separate emails? Thanks, Rachel

  5. Ann VanderMeer says

    Preferable to be in 3 individual emails – that way we can address each story separately. (NOTE: If you have already submitted in one email, do not worry. We’re flexible!)

  6. Ann VanderMeer says

    Yes, open to all. Stories must fit the guidelines, be unique and the BEST stories ever….

  7. Rachel says

    I always laugh when people use the term “best” in contexts like these. You know people, people like us, stay up until 4 a.m. arguing, uh, I mean discussing, what is considered “best.” It’s an advertising term and is not in any way objective and subject to all kinds of interpretations. But, such is life.

  8. jeff vandermeer says

    It’s rather more relevant as a term when you’re doing a retrospective antho reaching back to the 1970s, however. I think the point is, those submitting are competing against the full continuum of feminist fiction over the past 40-plus years. Besides, I think Ann is making the point that while men can submit, it’s reasonable to assume that they’re not the point of the book.

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