Curious? Imaginative? Weird? Books for You…to Gift!

I’ve just posted a feature on Omnivoracious entitled “Gift Books for the Imaginative, the Curious, the Weird.” It features around 20 books, some of which you might not have heard of already. Feel free to signal boost the article, as lots of indie presses are featured and many of the writers aren’t household names yet. Alas, Catherynne M. Valente’s Under in the Mere and Ellen Kushner’s The Man With the Knives are not available on Amazon—perhaps out of print? Anyway, both are well worth the effort to seek out and buy.

Below the cut, the entire list–but go check out the feature, since it includes more information on all of them, and more images.

Half World by Hiromi Goto (Viking)

The Wild Kingdom by Kevin Huizenga (Drawn & Quarterly)

Eden by Pablo Holmberg (Drawn & Quarterly)

The Weird Fiction Review, edited by S.T. Joshi (Centipede Press)

The Library of Forgotten Books by Rjurik Davidson (PS Publishing)

Elmer by Gerry Alanguilan (Slave Labor Graphics)

Light Boxes by Shane Jones (Penguin)

Horse, Flower, Bird by Kate Bernheimer (Coffee House Press)

Poetry, Fiction, and Essays by Eric Basso (various)

Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead by Barbara Comyns (Dorothy)

Event Factory by Renee Gladman

Scorch Atlas by Blake Butler (Featherproof Books)

I Wonder by Marian Bantjes (The Monacelli Press)

The Honey Month by Amal El-Mohtar (Papaveria Press)

Black Static magazine, edited by Andy Cox


The Revisionist
by Miranda Mellis
(Calamari Press)

Comments

  1. says

    The Library of Forgotten Books is head and shoulders above anything else on my “God I Need to Order That” list. I need some new blood in my short fiction.

  2. says

    Nice books! I think I’m going to pick Light Boxes because I love Penguin classics so I’m sure this one would be similar in caliber to the other Penguin books I’ve read and loved.

  3. says

    I love the fact that Who was changed and who was dead by Barbara Comyns has made it onto this list as that is one of my all time favourites. If you enjoy the surreality in that then you may enjoy The Vet’s Daughter by the same author!

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